SEO

What’s Going On With Google?

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Google’s algorithms are constantly evolving but a closer look today reveals they are now focusing on the meaning behind the terms under which users are searching. To achieve this they utilise their unique size and scope to trawl millions of websites to look for the answer to each and every query before returning with thousands of answers that need to be ranked against one another.

In providing this shortlist of answers to users, Google strives to give users the most well written and intriguing content, and rightly so. Search engine algorithms look for a variety of criteria when ranking, most importantly is the freshness of your content, so updating it regularly is imperative.

The phrases used on your website are also monitored in relation to the searched topic, which means getting highly comparative words and terms included is a must. You can see how else you can benefit from brilliant content here.

The release of Google’s Panda algorithm in 2011 made it harder for websites and business trying to survive in the search engine game. 2012’s Penguin update made excellent content its focus, and the 2013 release of Hummingbird proved you couldn’t just cheat with basic keywords anymore and Google was adapting to the trending behaviour of users simply keying in questions instead of search terms.

Keyword stuffing is a common term in the SEO industry, and should be avoided at all costs. Naturally flowing, unique content wins hands down on webpage rankings over multiple word mentions. If Google detects an unusually high amount of keywords on a page, it will be flagged as badly written content and over-optimisation.

Google uses the bounce rate of your website to monitor the effectiveness of it, so engaging content is a must. If visitors only view one landing page, it could be an indication that your content is failing. Including links to other pages on your site and having likeable, appealing updates is a sure-fire way to combat a high bounce rate.

Are you on Google+? You should be. Google takes any content you post there and indexes it immediately, thus giving you a better standing in the search engine rankings.

The majority of SEO experts are continuing to navigate through the newest algorithm update, Pigeon, but have so far found it has a stronger focus on contextual intelligence for searches. With this, trendy technological eyewear Google Glass breaking the market and 2015 bringing more editions of Google’s popular Nexus phone, we can be sure that next year’s update will tie in and be pretty spectacular.

Google Algorithm Updates – What you need to know

Since April 2011 Google has made some significant updates to its search algorithm, unless you work in the SEO industry you’re unlikely to have heard of them. However, if you are in any way involved in online marketing then these must be taken into account for every channel.

Google Panda & Penguin

April 2011 – Google Panda – Targeted websites with poor quality content, spam & duplicated content

April 2012 – Google Penguin – Targeted websites with dubious back-links and over-optimisation

Sept 2013 – Google Hummingbird – To reflect how more and more people are beginning to ask search engines questions like they would ask a human being – “How long should I boil an egg?”

These changes demonstrate the search giants efforts to answer the demands of its users almost before they know what those demands actually are. The affects of these changes are greater than you would imagine or even notice, but they aren’t something any business can ignore.

Well to give you an idea, here are some examples…

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Google Panda 4.0 – why it still matters!

On Tuesday this week, Google rolled out the latest update to their Panda Algorithm. As the first release of Google Panda was a big reason behind us starting our agency back in 2011, we thought many of you would be interested to learn why Panda remains relevant and important for anyone doing business online.

Panda was first released in February 2011 in an effort by Google to reduce the number of low-quality sites appearing in its search results. Considering the algorithm has been in operation for over 3 years many of you may wonder – why this is still news?

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